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He thought about his mother and sisters and the grandmother who died in childbirth and began to read widely in the literature of civil rights and feminism. Eventually he came across the concept of “reproductive justice,” developed by black feminists who argued that the best way to raise women out of poverty is to give them control of their reproductive decisions. Finally, he had his “come to Jesus” moment and the bell rang. This would be his civil-rights struggle. He would serve women in their darkest moment of need. “The protesters say they’re opposed to abortion because they’re Christian,” Parker says. “It’s hard for them to accept that I do abortions because I’m a Christian.” He gave up obstetrics to become a full-time abortionist on the day, five years ago, that George Tiller was murdered in church.
Take the time to read this moving piece on the incredible Dr. Willie Parker, who won’t let anyone stop him from providing people seeking abortion with the care they need. (via ppaction)

Writing off the word “bisexual” as exclusionary means cutting ties with bisexuals who were romantically and sexually involved with people of more than two genders decades before we were even born

bisexual-community:

ritchiesmagicalworld:

Writing off the word bisexual as exclusionary means cutting ties with bisexuals who were romantically and sexually involved with people of more than two genders decades before we were even born, and whom were forced to struggle and fight for recognition, only to now be othered as oppressors who aren’t “queer enough” for young gays, lesbians, and pansexuals.

Part of a Very Long History of hetero (& homo) normative cisgender monosexuals ignoring anything actual bisexual people had to say for and about themselves, inventing amazingly screwy definitions and creating new terms (i.e. ambisexual in 1912, omnisexual in 1959, pansexual in 1917, etc., etc., etc.) that they then imposed on bisexual people no matter what we said.

The question is, do they think that by slicing, dicing and redefining us, bisexuals will actually go away forever?

Or are we just supposed to get confused & discouraged and go away long enough for them to use our statistics and numbers while they scoop up all the grant funding, jobs, tenured teaching positions, groups and programs and other goodies?

(via mcdelta-t)

(Source: ritchandfamous)

oh-snap-pro-choice:

rafi-dangelo:

Bill Maher getting his ass handed to him on Islam is making the rounds again today. (x)

The whole exchange is part of a larger segment about Benghazi from May of last year, but The Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald from really lays it out in black and white.  Given the situation in Gaza, I can see why this clip has had a boost in popularity.

Glenn:  Lots of religions — not just Islam — produce violence.

Bill: That’s a silly, liberal view that all religions are alike because it makes you feel good.

Glenn:  No it makes you feel good to say our side is better because those people over there are —

Bill:  No it makes you feel good to put a crown on your head and say, “I’m a good person.  How do I prove that — “

Glenn:  You get to ignore the responsibility that your own government has for the violence and instability in the world by saying, “Look.  It’s that primitive religion over there that’s to blame.”

This tea is just so flavorful and full of truth.

The amount of truth in this.
-Ash

Amatonormativity is “the assumption that a central, exclusive, amorous relationship is normal for humans, in that it is a universally shared goal, and that such a relationship is normative, in the sense that it should be aimed at in preference to other relationship types”

A philosopher explains the moral value of all caring relationships

Oh my… and suddenly a lot makes sense.

(via spheresofpossibility)

(Source: reasonandnonsense)

justrollinon:

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” 

Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. 

Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. 

When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”

Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”

You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.

To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/

For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.

For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

That’s awesome :)

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